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New Mexico: Madrid Concedes - Will Not Request A Recount PDF  | Print |  Email
By Warren Stewart, VoteTrustUSA   
November 21, 2006

Party Requests a 2% Manual Audit

 

At a press conference this morning, Democratic challenger Patricia Madrid has announced her decision not to request a full hand recount of the race for New Mexico’s 1st District Congressional District. After all provisional ballots had been counted incumbent Rep. Heather Wilson’s lead over Madrid had dwindled to 875 votes, a margin of less than ½% of the total ballots cast.

 

After Madrid conceded, John Wertheim, the chair of the Democratic Party of New Mexico, announced that the Democratic Party will be asking for a 2% audit/recount. The reason for the ambiguous audit/recount statement is that the new law which does not take effect has provisions for an audit where the current law only has provisions for a recount.

According to the Albuquerque Journal, Democratic Party Executive Director Matt Farrauto had confirmed Monday that the party had inquired about the cost of a recount. Madrid's concession brings to a close one of the closest remaining undetermined Congressional contests. At her press conference Madrid cited cost and a family illnes as factors in her decision not to request a recount.


The Journal article continued:
Farrauto said the decision to seek a recount would likely come down to a "cost-benefit analysis" in which the price tag of the recount would be weighed against the chances the count could turn the race.

Ray Baray, a spokesman for the Secretary of State's Office, said a recount of the entire congressional district would likely cost about $30,000 and would require about 1,600 election officials to return to work.
The state law regarding recounts was modified after the 2004 elections, and now a candidate seeking a recount must pay a $50 deposit for each precinct in which a recount is demanded and a deposit of $10 for each voting machine - such as the optical scan tabulators used in this election.A 2005 election bill had established that candidate’s were required to deposit the full estimated cost of the recount, but this requirement was later struck down in court.
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